Uber is the fucking worst

A city of Portland investigation found that Uber used their secret software tool named "Greyball," to evade regulators.

What exactly did they do? Uber launched in Portland in December of 2014 without proper permits. The company built Greyball to trick regulators in several cities as reported by The New York Times in March.

How did it work? Greyball matched credit card data Uber bought to identify cards used by government officials and law enforcement officers. The software also looked for other signals such as location (near a government building, for instance) to identify regulators. Those identified as working for the local government would either see no cars when they opened the app or have their rides cancelled.

What happened in Porltand? Uber used the service to block 16 government officials' accounts and denied 29 ride requests. The city opened an investigation after The New York Times revealed Greyball.

What now? Nothing. Uber will face no penalties in the city and they have promised not to use the software again. Of course, Uber is now operating legally in Portland, so there is no need to use Greyball.

Here's the official line:

Uber has complied with our subpoena and provided the requested information associated with the Greyball tool. "Through this subpoena process, we have a greater understanding of their activities in Portland, and the extent to which the Greyball tool was used here. Moving forward, we have ensured that no attempts to evade regulators or deny service to riders in violation of City code or law will be allowed in the future.

-- Portland Transportation Commissioner Dan Salzman,